Fall 2008 UPDATE
Sep 20, 2008 • Newsletters

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Historic bill to end chimpanzee research

With growing public support, mounting scientific evidence, and evolving national and international laws on behalf of chimpanzees, the Great Ape Protection Act (GAPA) H.R. 5852 was introduced to the House this past spring by U.S. Representatives Edolphus Towns (D-NY), David Reichert (R-WA), Jim Langevin (D-RI), Roscoe Bartlett (R-MD), Thomas H. Allen (D-ME), Bruce L. Braley (D-IA), John Campbell (R-CA), and Mary Bono Mack (R-CA). GAPA calls for an end to invasive biomedical research and testing on chimpanzees. The bill would also retire all federally owned chimpanzees in labs—many for more than 40 years—to permanent sanctuary. Spearheaded by Project R&R and the HSUS, the bill is bolstered by Project R&R’s years of previous and continuing work to educate the public about the use of chimpanzees in research and testing. With our help and the work of other chimpanzee experts, the bill is gaining unprecedented support from the public as well as scientists, physicians, and educators.

Theodora Capaldo, EdD, President and Executive Director of Project R&R, notes, “With passage of this bill, the U.S. will join other scientifically advanced nations who have already banned or severely limited the use of chimpanzees, and all great apes, in research. It’s time for the U.S.—the single largest user—to join this world community.”

The bill has been referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Health. House Reps continue to sign on as co-sponsors. In 2000, the CHIMP Act had 143 cosponsors. Project R&R is working hard to match or exceed this number. We are asking our members to contact their legislators and urge them to sign on.

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