Resources

November 01, 2014 Bailey, J. (2014). Alternatives to Laboratory Animals (ATLA), Vol. 42, Issue 5.

Summary — Assertions that the use of monkeys to investigate human diseases is valid scientifically are frequently based on a reported 90–93% genetic similarity between the species. Critical analyses of the relevance of monkey studies to human biology, however, indicate that this genetic similarity does not result in sufficient physiological similarity for monkeys to constitute good models for research, and that monkey data do not translate well to progress in clinical practice for humans.…

Anxiety experiments on rhesus macaque monkeys by Ned Kalin, PhD, have been approved at the University of Wisconsin-Madison despite decades of opposition, the cruelty of such studies, and the lack of any benefit to humans that they yield. A 1986 report, written by Martin L. Stephens, PhD, former NEAVS science advisor, on behalf of NEAVS, AAVS, and NAVS, outlines a summary of similar studies back to their originator, Harry Harlow,…

August 19, 2014 Groff, K., Bachli, E., Lansdowne, M., and Capaldo, T. (2014). Environments, 2014.

Abstract: Millions of animals are used in research and toxicity testing, including in drug, medical device, chemical, cosmetic, personal care, household, and other product sectors, but the environmental consequences are yet to be adequately addressed. Evidence suggests that their use and disposal, and the associated use of chemicals and supplies, contribute to pollution as well as adverse impacts on biodiversity and public health. The objective of this review is to examine such evidence. The review…

Implementing the CHIMP Act The Case for Federally Promulgated Criteria to Immediately Retire Chimpanzees from Laboratories to Sanctuary
February 05, 2013 Capaldo, T., Bailey, J., and Groff, K. (2012). Journal of Animal Welfare Law, Autumn 2012/Winter 2013.

Over 900 chimpanzees continue to languish in laboratories in the U.S., the last remaining largescale user of chimpanzees for research.1 The U.S. government owns or financially supports nearly 600 of them.2 Some were wild-caught in Africa; others were born in a lab or sent from zoos, circuses, and animal trainers. Some were taught to communicate using sign language or raised in family settings - only to be sent into biomedical…

November 06, 2012 Capaldo, T., Bradshaw, G.A. (2011) Animals & Society Institute Policy Paper

Los chimpancés (Pan troglodytes) comparten muchas de las facultades y capacidades psicológicas que provocan la aprobación de leyes cuando se encuentran en el ser humano, para proteger a nuestra especie del abuso. Sin embargo, la legislación actual de los EE. UU. permite que se trate a los chimpancés cautivos de un modom que no se permitiría enseres humanos, como por ejemplo su uso en la investigación biomédica. El diagnóstico reciente…

October 12, 2012 Capaldo, T. & Peppercorn, M. (2012). Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, 40(5).

Approximately 1,000 chimpanzees are currently held in five federally owned or supported U.S. laboratories. This study reviews 110 autopsy reports on chimpanzees who died from 2001-2011 in laboratories or in sanctuaries who were from laboratories, in order to glean information about their pre-morbid health and causes of death. The findings raise questions about the health status of the chimpanzees remaining in laboratories. Most chimpanzees currently held are not in active…

Lessons from Chimpanzee-Based Research on Human Disease The Implications of Genetic Differences
October 17, 2011 Bailey, J. (2011). Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, 39(6):527–540.

The validity of using chimpanzees to investigate human diseases is frequently asserted via claims of the 98-99% genetic similarity between humans and chimpanzees. Critical analyses of the relevance of chimpanzee studies to human biology, however, indicate that this genetic similarity does not result in sufficient physiological similarity for the chimpanzee to constitute a good model for research, and that there is a lack of translation of chimpanzee data to clinical…

The Bioethics of Great Ape Well-Being: Psychiatric Injury and Duty of Care
October 17, 2011 Capaldo, T., Bradshaw, G.A. (2011) Animals & Society Institute Policy Paper

Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) possess the same psychological faculties and capacities that, when found in humans, motivate laws to protect our species from abuse. However, current U.S. regulations permit captive chimpanzees to be treated in ways that humans are not, such as in use for biomedical research. Recent diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in chimpanzees who have been used in biomedical research requires us to re-examine the regulatory status quo…

October 17, 2010 Capaldo, T., Owens, M., & Lary, M. (2010). Project R&R.

While other nations have banned or limited great-ape use in research, approximately 1,000 federally owned and/or supported chimpanzees remain in U.S. laboratories. Less than 20% are in research protocols, the majority “warehoused” at great cost and questionable benefit to taxpayers. Recent publications conclude chimpanzee research has made limited contributions to human health; is replaceable by more productive alternatives; has been counter-productive to advancements; and causes serious psychological as well as…

June 01, 2010 Bailey, J. (2010). Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, 38(5):387-418.

The USA is the only significant user of chimpanzees in biomedical research in the world, since many countries have banned or limited the practice due to substantial ethical, economic and scientific concerns. Advocates of chimpanzee use cite hepatitis C research as a major reason for its necessity and continuation, in spite of supporting evidence that is scant and often anecdotal. This paper examines the scientific and ethical issues surrounding chimpanzee…